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Delancey Street
San Francisco
600 Embarcadero San Francisco, CA 94107
415-512-5104 (Tel)
415-512-5141 (Fax)

Delancey Street
Los Angeles
400 N. Vermont Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90004
323-644-4122 (Tel)
323-644-4147 (Fax)

Delancey Street
New Mexico
P.O. Box 1240
San Juan Pueblo, NM 87566
505-852-4291 x304 (Tel)
505-852-4292 (Fax)

Delancey Street
North Carolina
811 N. Elm Street
Greensboro, NC 27401
336-379-8477 (Tel)
336-379-9449 (Fax)

Delancey Street
New York
100 Turk Hill Road
Brewster, New York 10509
845-278-6181 x205 (Tel)
845-278-2326 (Fax)

For other questions about Delancey, please call 415-512-5190

For media requests, please call 415-512-5191


 

 


We are a community where people with nowhere to turn, turn their lives around.

Delancey Street is the country's leading residential self-help organization for former substance abusers, ex-convicts, homeless and others who have hit bottom. Started in 1971 with 4 people in a San Francisco apartment, Delancey Street has served many thousands of residents, in 5 locations throughout the United States. Residents at Delancey Street range from teenagers to senior citizens, and include men and women and all races and ethnicities. The average resident has been a hard-core drug and alcohol abuser, has been in prison, is unskilled, functionally illiterate, and has a personal history of violence and generations of poverty.

The minimum stay at Delancey Street is 2 years while the average resident remains for almost 4 years – drug, alcohol and crime-free. During their time at Delancey Street, residents receive a high school equivalency degree (GED) and are trained in 3 different marketable skills. Beyond academic and vocational training, residents learn important values, and the social and interpersonal skills that allow them to live successfully in the mainstream of society.

Any act of violence, or threat of violence, is cause for immediate removal from Delancey Street. Interestingly, former gang members, who have sworn to kill each other, live and work together peacefully starting in dorm-rooms and moving up into their own apartments. Residents learn to work together promoting non-violence through a principle called “each-one-teach-one” where each new resident is responsible for helping guide the next arrival.

Delancey Street 30th Anniversary Celebration

Related Media
"The Road From Prison to Rehabilitation" (New York Times, 01/11)
“Moving Men Into the Mainstream: Best Practices in Prisoner Reentry Assistance" (Center for Civic Innovation, Civic Bulletin 51, Manhattan Institute 03/08)
Chapters in book, Change or Die, (HarperCollins, Inc., New York, NY, 2007)
"Passionaries, Turning Compassion into Action," (Templeton Foundation Press, West Conshohocken, PA., 2006)
"The Heart of America," (Health Communications, Inc., Deerfield Beach, Fl., 2004)
Chapter in book, America’s New Vision, (1st Books Library, Bloomington, IN, 2002)
"Delancey Street: Where Drug Addicts, Criminals, and The Homeless Go to Turn Their Lives Around" (A&E Biography, 08/97)
After 26 years, Delancey Street still offers second chances” (San Jose Mercury News, 06/97)
"Crossing Delancey" (Hope Magazine, 02/97)
"Where Life’s Losers Are Building New Lives" (New York Times, 03/89)
Delancey Street Foundation on Oprah (Quicktime)
Delancey Street Foundation on The Discovery Channel (Quicktime)



     
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